What is a “Native” App?

I was recently asked my opinion on what makes a “native” app, and this was my response:

It depends on how you split that hair.

I think it depends on what platform level (hardware, OS, etc.) the particular user of the word native thinks that word applies to. It seems many use the word to refer to the actual bytecode and whether it matches the hardware (the CPU) – but in those cases I often see the term native used with the CPU architecture in the description – such as native ARM, or not native x86. iOS apps compiled with AIR 2.6 I’d say are compiled to native ARM bytecode.

There are other ways to parse it though – for example, it was pointed out to me that AIR for iOS apps are compiled from ABC bytecode into ARM bytecode to avoid the JIT (and Apple’s restrictions on the use of JIT), but that code still uses the virtual machine – the garbage collector, sandbox and whatnot. This gets right up to the edge of my understanding of virtual machines. But, if the use of a VM precludes an app from being called native then could .NET be native on Windows, or Dalvik apps on Android? In the case of .NET, there is even a JIT (pretty sure on that one, but not entirely so).

Then there’s the issue of targeted API (and ABI) – if an app is compiled to run on Windows, but is running in a VM on Linux, it’s probably not native (even though it’s CPU architecture probably matches), but if it runs in WINE on Linux, is that native?

Speaking of the Linux crowd – they parse their platforms even more granularity – Gnome apps, running on KDE are not native to some people, simply because they use a different GUI toolkit, though something running in an interpreted language like Python are native if they use the “native” GUI toolkit. Games are not subject to this line of reasoning – if it runs on Linux in OpenGL (without WINE) then it’s native.

I even remember reading some opinions in various places that programs not written in C are not native to Linux, and programs not written in C++ are not native to Windows – despite those programs using all the same APIs, ABIs, and not running a in VM.

So what is my opinion? As it relates to my current favorite target platform, I wouldn’t call an AIR app native – especially since it requires a 3rd party runtime to be installed separately (like on Android or desktops), and doesn’t have access to the native GUI toolkits and widgets and other OS APIs. That’s not a hard and fast opinion though, my definition of native is pretty malleable, and likely to change over time (or over the course of writing this response). I think I’d have a hard time selling the idea that a Java or AIR app is native to a client – on Android mostly because of the separate runtime requirement – and on all platforms, because of the lack of access to OS level APIs. It would feel disingenuous to call an AIR app a native app.

AIR for iOS comes closest to being reasonably called a native app – it is compiled as a complete standalone package, and runs pretty close to the metal (being compiled to ARM code) – and most importantly doesn’t require a third party runtime to be installed separately. If AIR for iOS apps had access to the native (underlying OS platform) GUI toolkit and other APIs, I would be more comfortable calling it native, though probably still wouldn’t.

Probably the best definition of “native” I could come up (which you still won’t get anywhere close to universal agreement on) is an app that comes out of using the platform maker’s tools to develop apps for the platform – XCode + Objective-C (and other supported languages) for OSX and iOS, Visual Studio for Windows and Windows Phone, Android SDK for Android – even using Adobe’s tools to make an AIR app makes it a “native” AIR app – where using HaXe may not count as native.

Generally though, as much as I could, I would try not to discuss whether or not an app development tool like AIR is native at all – especially since that term is so subjective. A project needs a particular problem solved, and if I can do that with AIR (on iOS that means it doesn’t require iOS GUI elements and conventions, or other features of iOS), then that’s what I’d recommend.

Update: AIR 3.0 closes this gap, and makes the “Native App” comparison easier because of two features; 1. Captive runtime – no more separate runtime requirement means it’s a standalone app. 2. Native Extensions – now an app has access to all the native functionality of the underlying platform. I’m comfortable calling an AIR app a Native App with AIR 3.0.

Author: Kevin Newman

I'm the lead developer at adcSTUDIO located in Kingston NY (in Livingston Manor NY before that). I do all kinds of things there, from robust server side work to the much more enjoyable client side development in HTML/JavaScript/Flash (RIAs, HTML5, etc.) and all the other tech-buzz-phrases of the moment. My brother came up with the idea for unFocus.com which was originally meant be a place to discuss and blog about whatever topics we both found interesting, from politics to technology, to art and design. Time was scarce, and I need a place to host History Keeper, and unFocus Projects - a sub focus of unfocus.com was born, and eventually migrated to the font page. Oh, and I'm on Twitter (@Touvan) and Google+.

4 thoughts on “What is a “Native” App?”

  1. I was having a conversation with a colleague who kept claiming an App was nothing more that a link to a website. Although I can understand where he is coming from, I can’t agree with him. However, I have exhausted all my brain power and arguments, can you help me? I just want to know your thoughts that way I can continue my quest to prove him wrong or agree to his claim.

  2. It’s kind of tough. Many are only just recently figuring out what the difference is between an app (native) and a website-in-a-mobile-browser (HTML5). In terms of user requirements, it has so much more to do with how users actually use apps and websites. I would concentrate on the areas where “app-store-apps” are different from “mobile-web-apps”. It really and truly doesn’t matter what either one is written in, but the features and user install and integration experience does really matter, quite a lot. With a native app, or “app-store-app” you can have push notifications, background services, greater performance (if that matters for a particular app), presence in app stores, etc. You also have a different development environment, and usually more overhead if you want to go cross platform. At the end of the day, it all comes down to what platform features do you need to take advantage of, and what kind of integration experience will you (and your client) tolerate – and how big your budgets are. I hope that helps. šŸ™‚

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